The Fifty-fifth session of the CSW took place at United Nations (UN) Headquarters in New York, 2011.The Priority theme in this occasion was the Access and participation of women and girls in education, training, science and technology, including for the promotion of women’s equal access to full employment and decent work. The agreed conclusions adopted by the Commission were transmitted to the Economic and Social Council being one of the main areas: Making science and technology responsive to women’s needs, which encourages the creation of awareness of the needs of women in science and technology, including by encouraging the media to sponsor popular science programming, and report on the differential impact of science and technology on women and men and the integration of a gender perspective in the science and technology curricula throughout all stages of education and continuous learning, and the use of gender-based analysis and gender impact assessments in research and development in science and technology, and promote a user driven approach to technology development in order to increase the relevance and usefulness of advancements in science and technology for both women and men (CSW 2011- Agreed conclusions on access and participation of women and girls in education, training and science and technology, including for the promotion of women’s equal access to full employment and decent work. (p.10)

► Gender research: A how-to guide United Nations International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of women. (UN-INSTRAW)

The guide was aimed to provide researchers with practical information on integrating gender concerns into research projects and programmes in order to make research more accurate and ultimately more useful in influencing policy formulation and implementation. The guide includes concrete examples that illustrate the different steps involved in making research gender-sensitive, a top-ten list of gendered research characteristics, and a section with additional resources. The guide is purposefully general so that it can be adapted to particular circumstances – research methods that best capture the complexities of gender issues are those that are adapted to the specific context (p.1)