IGAR refers to the use of sex- and/or gender analysis in all the phases of the research cycle.  It means taking into account the biological characteristics of both females and males (sex) and the evolving social and cultural features of women and men (gender).

Still today, the way scientific knowledge is produced, applied and translated to the society is not free from the global and structural system that produces gender inequalities based on organising men and women in hierarchical different roles. Gender-blind and gender-biased research methods produce poor science and miss opportunities, often based in gender stereotypes and the use of male/men as default generic model for all human beings. To tackle this problem, efforts are being made to raise awareness on gender biases and to show other ways of producing more inclusive science, responsive to the needs of everybody, by means of Integrating the Gender Analysis into Research (IGAR, also known as “incorporating the gender dimension into research content”).

IGAR refers to the use of sex- and/or gender analysis in all the phases of the research cycle.  It means taking into account the biological characteristics of both females and males (sex) and the evolving social and cultural features of women and men (gender).

In some projects only a sex analysis will be relevant to the research (for instance preclinical studies on cells and tissues, and in animals in most cases) for example in medical studies to develop new drugs.

In some others, only a gender analysis will be necessary (mainly in studies where biological differences do not play a role) for example, reducing the existing gender inequalities by developing new tools aimed to detect and prevent gender-based violence.

And in other cases, both sex and gender interact in a particular study, for example in studies of nutrition or exercise, where hormonal, physiological, and cultural factors can influence the likelihood of disease