• Ensure the communication and coordination among the relevant national institutions with responsibilities in the areas of HEI, Gender Equality, Research and Innovation, by means of inter-ministries working groups, committees, etc.
  • Ensure that accreditation agencies effectively apply relevant IGAUC criteria when accrediting the Bachelor and Masters programmes1.
  • Ministries and national agencies are recommended to develop specific projects/activities targeting the institutions (universities, accreditation agencies, local governments, etc.) and the institutional levels (decision-makers) with responsibility for university curricula development in order to map, monitor, improve, etc. their policies/recommendations aimed at letting students get the necessary skills for conducting sex/gender analysis in research and innovation projects2. For it, is also convenient to count on the non-academic professional’s perspective, for instance, to identify the lacks of sex/gender competencies they have found in the daily practice on their respective fields and the useful materials they have found/create to cope with them3.
  • Boost the networking of academics by main field of science at national/international level, to support each other and to promote the exchange of good practises in IGAUC and the advancement in their specific field.
  • 1. The paper by Ruth Becker et al. (2008), below mentioned at the C.4 section on Models for IGAUC, details three main aspects to be considered “minimum standards” on gender interdisciplinary issues when accrediting university programmes: 1) professional aspects of the subject area, 2) the criticism of discipline specific knowledge, and 3) aspects of the production and use of the discipline’s research results. (pp.9-10). Available at https://www.gender.hu-berlin.de/de/publikationen/gender-bulletins/texte-34/bulletin-texte-34
  • 2. See for instance, in the C.4 section (on Models for IGAUC), the case of the on-line model database resulting from the “Gender in bachelor and master courses - integrate women’s and gender studies into the curriculum” research project supported by the Ministry for Innovation, Science, Research and Technology.
  • 3. For instance, at an international level, the report on Integrating gender into the curricula for health professionals is the result of a meeting that the WHO Department of Gender, Women and Health (GWH) convened in December 2006 to ensure that these considerations are addressed in health policies and programmes. The document provides lists of core gender competencies for physicians and public health professionals and recommendations for policy-makers and medical educators to move the agenda forward. Another example is The Sex and Gender Women’s Health Collaborative (SGWHC) coordinated effort of the American Medical Women’s Association, the American College of Women’s Health Physicians, and Society for Women’s Health Research initially aimed to address the gaps in medical education surrounding sex and gender specific care of women but also expected to lead to a critical assessment of our understanding of men’s health (more detailed information in Advancing sex and gender competency in medicine: sex & gender women’s health collaborative).